Tag Archives: change

You Can’t Be Lazy and Still Want to Change Your Life for the Better

1 Jun

If you’ve read this blog before, or watched my videos or even more so have come to my classes, you know that what I’m about to tell you about really pisses me off.  In a survey taken a few months ago,it was found that most people that are unhappy at their jobs to very little to change their situation.  This is a behavior that leaves me dumbfounded.

For my new readers, I became fed up with my lack of financial success – and increasing debt – more than a decade ago.  After stumbling through bad business ideas and deals, I plunked down and finally discovered the keys to my now continued success.  But even before I found those keys, I declared to my job that in two years (this is in 20o2) that I would be leaving –retiring – and that they should find my replacement.  In that two years I cleared up my $45,000 worth of debt and soon after became a millionaire.  I realized that not everyone has my fortitude, and so I founded Insiders Group Inc. to teach others how to do what I did and am glad to have made others very successful in their own right.  But enough about me, this is about laziness.

If all you do is wallow in your depression, your situation will never change.  Everyone isn’t an entrepreneur, true, but anyone – given they seek the knowledge out to do so – can make something better of themselves for themselves, their families and their communities.

Unhappy Workers Do Little About It, Says Survey

by Kyle Stock

from FINS Technology – The Wall St. Journal

Griping about your job is one thing; doing something about it is something else entirely.

When it comes to hunting for a better position elsewhere, most of us don’t bother, according to a survey released this morning by Accenture. Almost half of the 3,400 workers questioned by the technology consulting firm said they were dissatisfied with their jobs, but only 30% of respondents had any plans to switch employers.

The more common strategy was to build up experience and look for a better opportunity in-house.

“There’s still a sense of commitment to take action with their current employer,” said LaMae Allen deJongh, the author of the study and Accenture’s managing director for human capital and diversity. “We interpret that as an opportunity.”

And while feeling underpaid was the biggest complaint, only about half of those surveyed had ever asked for or negotiated a pay raise.

If companies aren’t in a position to hand out raises, deJongh said they should offer promotions, greater responsibility and flexibly work arrangements to keep employees happy.

There is some evidence that job dissatisfaction is running particularly high. A recent report by the Conference Board, a nonprofit, New York-based research firm, found that 55% of Americans are dissatisfied with their jobs, the highest level in 22 years. Respondents also said the best part of their work as the company of colleagues and the commute.

No doubt, much of the recent discontent is tied to the economy at large. Those still in the workforce are likely doing more and earning less — or at least not much more — than they were a few years ago. And many are likely slogging away in positions they have little interest in.

Then again, there are almost 14 million people still looking for work — something to consider next time you feel like griping about your paycheck.

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