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Rethinking Retirement

21 Mar

Retirement to most people today means the end of working a job and living off of portfolio income (401k), a pension and social security. This concept, which is fairly new, is already obsolete. To understand this let’s examine its origins and progression.

Traditionally, in early America (from its founding until the mid 1880’s), when a family member was too old or physically unable to work, the other members of the extended family took care of him. However, four important demographic changes happened in America beginning in the mid-1880s that rendered the traditional systems of economic security obsolete: The Industrial Revolution, rapid urbanization, the disappearance of the extended family and a marked increase in life expectancy.

The Industrial Revolution transformed the majority of working people from self-employed agricultural workers into wage earners working for large industrial corporations. This meant mass migrations to urban centers where the work was to be found. In the crowded urban environments, family sizes were forced to get smaller. The cost of housing, clothing and feeding an extended family (grandparents, parents and children) was undoable in the new economy. This fostered the creation of the “nuclear family” (parents and children only) which most of us are accustomed to seeing today.

The final significant change happened in the early decades of the 20th century. Better health care, sanitation, and the development of public health programs, led Americans to live significantly longer. Between 1900 and 1930, average life spans increased by 10 years. This was the most rapid increase in life spans in recorded human history.

The net result of these historical demographic and social changes was that the traditional strategies for the providing for those no longer able to work quickly dissolved.

The decade of the 1930s found America facing the worst economic crisis in its modern history. Millions of people were unemployed, and the majority of the elderly lived in dependency. The traditional sources of economic security: assets, labor, family, and charity had all failed. Radical calls for action were being made by the public. President Franklin Roosevelt responded by signing into law The Social Security Act on August 14, 1935 to pay retired workers age 65 or older a continuing income after retirement.

Fast forward to today… Four major demographic changes have made that system obsolete as we emerge from the second worst economic crisis in US history. Change from the Industrial Age to the new Innovation Age, globalization, further dissolving of the nuclear family, and another marked increase in life expectancy.

The loss of manufacturing jobs, the increase of exportation of jobs, and importation of goods from the global economy has changed the face of the job market forever. Companies no longer promise work until retirement and a pension plan for your twilight years. Nuclear families have gotten even smaller and young people are more detached from their parents as this society celebrates individuality and independence over cooperative living. Finally, as medical technology improves, people are now outliving the age for which social security, their pensions and portfolios were designed to last.

The solution… the whole concept of retirement should be reevaluated. You only retire from a job (earned income) – especially a job you don’t enjoy. There is no retirement from passive income sources. With passive income sources that pay dividends (real estate, securities and business ownership), you work hard to acquire the asset and then it continues to pay you continuously until the market changes and it can no longer provide positive cash flow. You don’t retire; you simply shift your resources into a new cash producing asset.

Consumers Cutting Back? Are You Kidding?

8 May


By Peter Coy on May 07, 2012

Corrects Thornberg’s first name in 3rd paragraph.

Conventional wisdom says the economy is weak because consumers, constrained by excessive debt, are cutting back. That is wrong on two counts. I have a chart for each.

As the first chart shows, Americans aren’t cutting back a whole lot. Personal consumption as a share of gross domestic product is floating along at the highest it has been since at least 1948, at 71.1 percent. For comparison, it was way down at 62 percent as recently as the early 1980s.

This inconvenient truth—inconvenient for the “Americans are retrenching” camp, anyway—was pointed out to me by Christopher Thornberg, the founding partner of Los Angeles-based Beacon Economics. He and I were guests on KQED’s Forum radio program on May 4, along with Laura Tyson, the University of California-Berkeley Haas School of Business professor who was President Bill Clinton’s chief economic adviser. Here’s a link to the Forum podcast.

Personal consumption includes spending on imports, by the way, so some of the dollars leak overseas. It also includes almost all health-care spending, about half of which is under the control of the government, as my ex-boss, former BusinessWeek Chief Economist Michael Mandel, always likes to say.

It’s not that consumers are on a shopping spree. It’s that the other sectors are even weaker. Investment is sluggish because businesses are pessimistic about growth; direct government spending (not including transfer payments such as Social Security) is lagging because state and local governments are cutting back; and net exports are negative (i.e., we’re running a trade deficit, albeit one that has shrunk a bit).

Bottom line: As weak as they are, consumers are the engine of this sluggish recovery.

The second chart shows a key reason consumers are not cutting back: They don’t need to. This shows the Federal Reserve’s measure of financial obligations. It’s defined as the ratio of debt payments and other fixed charges to disposable personal income. The fixed charges include car lease payments, rent, homeowners’ insurance, and property tax payments.

Extremely low interest rates are making Americans’ debt sustainable. The burden will increase when rates start to rise, but presumably that won’t happen until the economy is getting stronger and incomes go up.

Says Thornberg: “There’s this ongoing argument that we’re in a painful period of deleveraging. No, we’re not, because there’s no reason at these interest rates for anyone to have to deleverage.”

2012 Assessments for Recession Driven Riches

30 Dec

This article is an excerpt from the book, Recession Driven Riches by Heru Ur Nekhet, national Renowned Rags to Riches Guru.

Chapter 5
Make An Honest Assessment Without Judgment

“Too many people spend money they haven’t earned, to buy things they don’t want, to impress people they don’t like.”
-Will Rogers

“Don’t succumb to excuses. Go back to the job of making the corrections and forming habits that will make your goal possible.”
-Vince Lombardi

Despite the appearance of wealth created by the mass accumulation of material goods during the last boom (homes, cars, electronics, clothes, etc.), most Americans got into the habit of living on borrowed money. Still in denial and oftentimes overwhelmed by the gravity of their financial situation, the majority of those people now find themselves deep in debt with no feasible plan to get their heads back above water. Proper realignment requires you to perform an honest assessment of your current skills, confidence, resources, mental and physical health, time management, asset values, and soundness of potential business ventures or investments. It is easy to minimize or exaggerate your financial situation if you are judgmental about how you got into the situation.

In order to effectively create a plan of action to fix your current situation, you have to know exactly how much income you have from all sources (job, investments, business, etc.) as well as exactly how much money is being spent in that same amount of time. It sounds simple, however most people never take an accurate accounting of how much money passes through their hands each month or year. Be careful not to overlook any income or expense no matter how small it might seem. Even the small expenses add up over time. If you don’t want to use the old fashion pencil and paper method to create a balance sheet, you can use an online expense tracking website such as Wesabe.com or Mint.com.

It is important that you also check the current value of any assets that you currently own. These assets include your home value, investment property value, securities (stocks, bonds, mutual funds, IRAs, etc.) and any other holdings you might have. Oftentimes we invest in assets and just forget about monitoring them to make sure they are still worth keeping. For real estate values you can check propertyshark.com or zillow.com. For securities you can check morningstar.com to see if they are profitable. For other assets such as gold or silver you can go to goldprice.org, but for collectables you should get a professional appraisal.

How do you know if an asset is worth keeping? The answer is simple, if it is currently performing at a rate of return that meets your current needs, then it is worth keeping. If it is no longer performing to your standard and the prospect of a turn around is not imminent, then cut your losses and get rid of it. Let’s start with your home. If your current home value is less than the purchase price, then you are paying on a mortgage for the next few decades far more than the price will ever be again. You are financing something that will probably never be worth what you are paying. This raises a couple of issues. First, it will never gain equity so you cannot borrow against it. Second, you will never be able to sell it and recoup the money you put into it. If you have no desire to ever borrow against it (refinance) or to sell it, and you have no desire to take advantage of the fact that you can now get more home for less than what you are currently paying, then you don’t have to do anything. Enjoy your overpriced home.

After taking an assessment of your current assets, you must seriously evaluate what resources you currently have to work with. These resources might include cash reserves, creditworthiness, insurance, professional advisors (accountant, broker, financial consultant, attorney, etc.), support from family or friends, knowledge, skills, etc. If you find that you are lacking necessary resources, then part of your realignment plan must include gathering needed resources.

Some Things to Assess

  • Debts – credit cards, loans, mortgages, etc.

  • Investments – real estate, stocks, bonds, IRA, TDA, 401(K), bank account, Certificate of Deposit (CD), gold, collectibles, etc.

  • Asset Values – real estate equity, gold appreciation, stock prices, collectible value, etc.

  • Income Sources – job, business ownership, dividends, rental income, etc.

  • Relationships – partnerships, family, friends, dependants, etc. Are they supportive or detrimental?

  • Skills – relevance and market value of skills, obsolescence of skills, etc.

  • Resources – time, cash flow, credit, partnerships, professional team, etc.

  • Expenses (liabilities) – basic living expenses, appropriateness of expenses, where and how to minimize expenses, etc.

  • Insurance – appropriateness of coverage, lack of coverage, excessive coverage, cost of coverage, etc.

  • Taxes – appropriate shelters, deductions, structure, etc.

  • Information Sources –news sources, opportunities, networking events, clubs, organizations, advisors, mentors, etc.

Get You Copy of Recession Driven Riches Now at http://www.recessiondrivenriches.com/

RECESSION DRIVEN RICHES book signing at the Circle Of Sisters Expo on Saturday 10/8!

6 Oct

 

Join our very own Heru Nekhet at the Circle Of Sisters Expo this Saturday (10/8/2011)  from 3-6pm as signs & sells copies of his new book Recession Driven Riches.

He’ll be at The Network Journal table (booth #534).  See you all there!

 

For more info on Circle of Sisters, go HERE.

 

You can also order the book at Fast Pencil Amazon.com, or Barnes & Noble (in paperback and eBook)

Using Secure Credit Cards and Comparing Effective Options to Repair Bad Credit Scores

8 Jun

Interesting advice from Red, White & Blue Press’ Alex Strobel on using secured credit cards and how the higher rates may not be such a bad thing.

Check it out:

http://bit.ly/IG-SS-cred10

You Can’t Be Lazy and Still Want to Change Your Life for the Better

1 Jun

If you’ve read this blog before, or watched my videos or even more so have come to my classes, you know that what I’m about to tell you about really pisses me off.  In a survey taken a few months ago,it was found that most people that are unhappy at their jobs to very little to change their situation.  This is a behavior that leaves me dumbfounded.

For my new readers, I became fed up with my lack of financial success – and increasing debt – more than a decade ago.  After stumbling through bad business ideas and deals, I plunked down and finally discovered the keys to my now continued success.  But even before I found those keys, I declared to my job that in two years (this is in 20o2) that I would be leaving –retiring – and that they should find my replacement.  In that two years I cleared up my $45,000 worth of debt and soon after became a millionaire.  I realized that not everyone has my fortitude, and so I founded Insiders Group Inc. to teach others how to do what I did and am glad to have made others very successful in their own right.  But enough about me, this is about laziness.

If all you do is wallow in your depression, your situation will never change.  Everyone isn’t an entrepreneur, true, but anyone – given they seek the knowledge out to do so – can make something better of themselves for themselves, their families and their communities.

Unhappy Workers Do Little About It, Says Survey

by Kyle Stock

from FINS Technology – The Wall St. Journal

Griping about your job is one thing; doing something about it is something else entirely.

When it comes to hunting for a better position elsewhere, most of us don’t bother, according to a survey released this morning by Accenture. Almost half of the 3,400 workers questioned by the technology consulting firm said they were dissatisfied with their jobs, but only 30% of respondents had any plans to switch employers.

The more common strategy was to build up experience and look for a better opportunity in-house.

“There’s still a sense of commitment to take action with their current employer,” said LaMae Allen deJongh, the author of the study and Accenture’s managing director for human capital and diversity. “We interpret that as an opportunity.”

And while feeling underpaid was the biggest complaint, only about half of those surveyed had ever asked for or negotiated a pay raise.

If companies aren’t in a position to hand out raises, deJongh said they should offer promotions, greater responsibility and flexibly work arrangements to keep employees happy.

There is some evidence that job dissatisfaction is running particularly high. A recent report by the Conference Board, a nonprofit, New York-based research firm, found that 55% of Americans are dissatisfied with their jobs, the highest level in 22 years. Respondents also said the best part of their work as the company of colleagues and the commute.

No doubt, much of the recent discontent is tied to the economy at large. Those still in the workforce are likely doing more and earning less — or at least not much more — than they were a few years ago. And many are likely slogging away in positions they have little interest in.

Then again, there are almost 14 million people still looking for work — something to consider next time you feel like griping about your paycheck.

Knock, Knock… Who’s There? OPPORTUNITY!

19 Apr

Greetings Insider:

It’s amazing how the mind works. You know you are not happy with your current financial situation, and you know that if you do the same things you did last year your financial situation is not going to get better… as a matter of fact, it will probably get worse. Yet, you still find yourself creating excuses why you aren’t willing to sacrifice two hours of your time to find out exactly how you can turn your financial situation …around. This is insane, especially when there is nothing to risk and a world of OPPORTUNITY to gain.

I know it’s not easy to make changes, even if the changes are good for you, and I know having a job and a family is tiring. Before 2004 I was in the same boat as you. I had a job that didn’t quite meet my expenses, family obligations and zero energy left at the end of the day. It wasn’t until I was sick and tired of working hard just to not have enough that I was able to take the right action, connect with the right people, and walk away from being broke and miserable forever.

I want to share with you the hard fought knowledge that I gained while turning my life around from having a $45,000 debt and a dead end job, to retiring at age 36, acquiring millions of dollars worth of real estate, several successful businesses and the comfort in knowing that I will never have to have another job in my life.

I hope you don’t have to hit rock bottom before you decide to take action, but if you can find just one good reason to drag yourself to this workshop I’m offering on Wednesday (4/20) at 7pm (If you absolutely can’t make Wednesday, I have one more date on Saturday 4/23 at 1pm). I’m holding nothing back in this truth revealing workshop about how wealth is really created and how you can cash in on the trillions of dollars being left on the table because others haven’t cracked the code to profiting in this new economy.

Multilevel marketing will not solve your problem! Dumping money into a 401K or Roth IRA is not the answer! And trying to acquire properties using short sales or REO’s is not the solution either! To find out how REAL money is being made, register for this powerful workshop “Insider Secrets to Financial Freedom” at 216 Greene Avenue in Brooklyn on Wednesday, April 20th at 7pm .

For information as valuable as this, you could easily expect to pay a thousand dollars or more. But I’m offering it to you absolutely FREE so don’t waste time registering. Warning: Because of space constraints, this offer is limited to the first thirty people to respond. (This email is going out to 278 people. So, register immediately by emailing me back right now or calling 718-622-2271 to secure your seat!)

I can’t force you to come. It’s always going to be your choice whether you get wealthy or not. To be honest, making lots of money and having plenty of free time isn’t for everyone. Some people need to work for someone else for the rest of their life. Only you know if you are ready… If you are ready, then call now or email me. I look forward to sharing in your success.

SUCCESS!!!!!!
Heru Nekhet
Taking Ordinary People From Rags to Riches

PS – If you could discover how you can quit your dead end job and have a steady stream of income for the rest of your life, it’s certainly worth two hours of your time. But since you may still be skeptical, I’m going to guarantee that this workshop will absolutely blow you away. If you don’t agree that his is the most mind blowing workshop you have ever attended, I’ll give you a crisp $20 bill for wasting your time.

PPS – Feel free to pass this on to family and friends

Insiders Group, Inc.
216 Greene Ave., B’klyn, NY 11238
718-622-2271
http://www.InsidersGroup.com